At Coffee Garden googling “Native American Mother Earth sayings”, and came to this one which hit me in that tender spot that is unique to this day.

For Ideas continuously swirl about who I am—and who we all are—with so much always in flux even while the earth forever balances herself by falling into the emptiness of space with the same force as she’s pulled into the sun.

In 1991–at the age of 23–I met my biological father’s family for the first time and they told me we have Micmac and Potowatomi ancestors. The fact of not knowing this wasn’t surprising—I didn’t know the dad I’d grown up with wasn’t my bio dad until I was 13; see The Journey to ‘Amy Brook’—and discovering it made me proud.

For I’m not a religious person by either nature or nurture yet when I transferred to UC Davis in 1988 to complete my undergrad, I specifically chose Native American Studies classes because I resonated so deeply with their core values. The idea that a “faith” could coordinate the life of a human into the soul of their planet was so profound to me that even today I walk outside into the church of our earth. Where mountains rise like the walls of amphitheater’s, and trees— housing the chirp of winged creatures— sway in air that moves across the planet, touching human beings one after the other.

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